BSF 'Creek Crocodiles' to man Indo-Pak border



BSF `Creek Crocodiles` to man Indo-Pak border Sir Creek (Gujarat): In order to thwart landing of terrorists through the sea route, BSF has formed its first commando unit -- Creek Crocodiles -- to man the hostile creek area where India shares border with Pakistan.

Creeks are a very hostile terrain constituting of numerous raised grounds having mangroves and a network of water channels which are quite shallow where all movements are tide dependent.

Creek Crocodiles are trained to thwart any evil designs from across the border, BSF Commandant Pushpendrasinh Rathore, who is training the commando unit at Koteshwar outpost of BSF said.

"We have kept three things in mind while selecting cadets for the commando including swimming and marine diving performance, firing abilities and endurance to work in the rough creek," Rathore said, adding IG BSF Gujarat range A K Sinha had given the idea of raising the commando force so that we can dominate the creek area.

The Crocodile units have 42 commandos at present and they are undergoing vigorous training, he said.

India has a long-standing dispute with Pakistan regarding the border in the creeks area and the issue has been on the agenda of talks between the two countries.

Several large creeks like Sir Creek, Pir Sanai Creek, Pabewari Creek, Vianwari Creek, Koori Creek and Deveri Creek in the region besides numerous drains in the area including the 'Harami Nallah' are vulnerable to infiltration.

The BSF has apprehended 15 Pakistanis including an ISI agent and seized three boats in three different operations in the last three months in the hostile creek and drain areas. They also managed to thwart an infiltration bid in the Harami Nallah area.

The marine commando unit was a long-term requirement of the BSF, officials said. "I am going to request the BSF top brass to provide more advance equipments to our commando units so that they become more effective," Rathore said.

"The government has already sanctioned hovercrafts and all terrain vehicles for the BSF in the border region," BSF DIG Vishnu Datt said.

The creek area is quiet vast, devoid of fresh water and even the air is full of salt.

From May to September the area is lashed by very strong winds and the water in the creeks is very turbulent. Hence, the area remains almost inaccessible expect for few uncertain opportunities, the officials added.

" In such situations, hovercrafts can make use of a few uncertain opportunities," they added.

PTI