UK to change rules to deport foreign criminals?



UK to change rules to deport foreign criminals? London: Faced with the inability to deport foreign criminals on grounds of human rights, Britain is likely to change immigration rules so that such individuals do not take recourse to an individual's "right to family life" under human rights rules to stay in the country.

Home secretary Theresa May, has made known her opposition to Article Eight in the European Convention on Human Rights that enables foreign nationals who commit crime in Britain to avoid deportation on the ground that they have set up a family in the country.

May is reported to be examining how to make clear in the immigration rules that a foreign national can be deported when they have been convicted of a criminal offence, breached immigration rules, set up a family life while in the UK illegally, chosen Britain as their country of residence or are unable to support themselves financially.

Prime Minister David Cameron said in an interview, "The problem here is that there are foreign criminals in Britain, people sometimes actually who still threaten our country or could threaten our country.

We are unable to deport them because they appeal to the courts under Article Eight of this charter, which is the right to a family life".

He added, "You are able to change the immigration rules and ask them to look more carefully about the danger these individuals pose.

The right to a family life is not an inalienable right in the European convention so I believe this change will work.

It is not the whole solution to the problem but it is a good start."

He added, "And you are able to change the immigration rules and ask them to look more carefully about the danger these individual pose. The right to family life is not an inalienable right in the European Convention, so we believe this change can work."

At the Conservative party conference in Manchester today, May is expected to announce her plans to stop foreign criminals from abusing the human rights rules to avoid deportation on the ground of an individual's "right to family life".

Last year there were 102 successful appeals against deportation on human rights grounds which cited Article Eight.

The Article, which ensures the right to a family life, has been cited by some foreign criminals fighting expulsion from Britain.

Many foreign criminals have avoided deportation by claiming that because they have partners or children in the UK, being thrown out of the country would infringe their rights under Article Eight.

PTI