Scotland issue: Britain works, why break it? says David Cameron



Zeenews Bureau

London: Making a strong pitch for retaining Scotland as a part of the United Kingdom, Prime Minister David Cameron on Sunday said that Scotland is better off in Britain.

Urging people to be well informed before they made a decision in the vote on Scotland independence due next year, British PM said that the government would tomorrow publish an expert based analysis detailing on Scotland’s role in the UK.

“We’ll be providing expert-based analysis to explain Scotland’s place within the UK and how it might change with separation.. We don’t shy away from putting facts and evidence before the Scottish people. We want you to scrutinize, challenge and form your own opinion”, wrote Cameron on British govt website named the No 10 website.

Reasoning that both “share a proud and emotional history”, Cameron sought to touch an emotional chord when he said that people of both the islands shared a deep, unbreakable bond and the matter was about head as well as heart.

Though ceding that Scotland could be an independent nation, Cameron questioned what was the need to break the Union when Britain worked well with Scotland as its part.

“The real question is whether it should – whether Scotland is stronger, safer, richer and fairer within our United Kingdom or outside it,” said Cameron.

The British PM also asserted that why people should be forced to choose between Scotland and Britain, when they were being offered “the best of both worlds” while in UK.

“Why swap Scottish MPs, Scottish Cabinet Ministers and Scots throughout UK institutions, for one Scottish Ambassador in London?” said Cameron.

The main political parties of London including the ruling Conservative Party is pitching strongly to avoid the separation of Scotland, but Alex Salmond’s Scottish National Party will leave no stone unturned to ensure an independent Scotland when there is a referendum next year.

Cameron had last year signed a deal with the leader of Scotland's separatist administration on a referendum that could break up the United Kingdom.

Both sides claim they are confident of victory in the vote that will decide the constitutional future of the United Kingdom.

If Scotland does break away it will end more than 300 years of political union with England.