Wolf DNA to explain dog's devotion to man



Wolf DNA to explain dog`s devotion to man London: Ancient wolf's DNA could help scientists figure out how our ancestors tamed the predators to become devoted to man.

The research from Durham and Aberdeen universities could show that domestication happened 35,000 years ago, about two and a half times longer ago than can currently be proven.

Some of the experts insist dogs were domesticated once in East Asia and spread from there, while others suggest it happened in several places at different times, the Telegraph reports.

Greger Larson, reader and expert in ancient DNA at Durham's department of archaeology, who led the study, said: "It is remarkable that despite the fact we have a good feel for the times and places of when cows, sheep, goats, and pigs were domesticated, we still don't have the first clue about dogs."

"Using a combination of state-of-the-art techniques, we hope to change that," said Larson. Larson said that unlike foxes, that tended to shun people, there had been "more of a partnership" with wolves.

They became tolerated, accepted and even revered by humans as they helped them to hunt and kill larger animals, Larson said.

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