Safer helmet unlikely to have saved Phillip Hughes: Report

The report also said the slow arrival of the ambulance to the Sydney Cricket Ground that provided medical treatment to the test cricketer played no part in his death.

Safer helmet unlikely to have saved Phillip Hughes: Report

Melbourne: Phillip Hughes was not wearing the highest-standard helmet when he was killed by a ball during a match 18 months ago but it was unlikely to have saved him anyway, a report into the Australian`s death said on Wednesday.

The batsman was struck on the back of the head by a rising delivery when playing for South Australia in a Sheffield Shield game in November 2014 and he died two days later in a Sydney hospital at the age of 25.

"The helmet was compliant with an Australian standard, which has since been withdrawn, but was not compliant with the more recent British standard," the report, led by barrister David Curtain, said.

"In any event ... I do not believe the new helmet would have afforded additional protection against the blow given the location of where Phillip was struck, as the protection to the neck, at the rear, is no different."

The report also said the slow arrival of the ambulance to the Sydney Cricket Ground that provided medical treatment to the test cricketer played no part in his death.

"Although there was apparently a delay in the ambulance arriving, Phillip was being cared for appropriately in the interim," it added.

"I am of the opinion the attention received by Phillip after being struck had no role whatsoever on his subsequent demise, due to the nature and severity of his injury."

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