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`He only wanted one`; Stuart Broad`s eight delight his dad

There was no prouder spectator at Trent Bridge as Stuart Broad took eight wickets to reduce Australia to 60 all out on the first day of the fourth Ashes Test than the England paceman`s father, Chris Broad.

`He only wanted one`; Stuart Broad`s eight delight his dad

Nottingham: There was no prouder spectator at Trent Bridge as Stuart Broad took eight wickets to reduce Australia to 60 all out on the first day of the fourth Ashes Test than the England paceman`s father, Chris Broad.

Broad`s stunning haul of eight for 15 in 9.3 overs on his Nottinghamshire home ground saw Australia bowled out in a historically low 18.3 overs -- the shortest completed first innings in the 138-year history of Test cricket.

After England captain Alastair Cook won the toss in overcast conditions, there was drama right from the third ball of the match when fast-medium bowler Broad had Chris Rogers caught at first slip by Cook for nought for his 300th Test wicket.

"He only wanted one, it`s just being greedy isn`t it?" Chris Broad told BBC Radio`s Test Match Special.

"He chatted to me a couple of days prior and said `all I want is one`. I was a bit concerned he was too focused on getting to 300," added Broad senior, himself a former Nottinghamshire and England opening batsman.

"If you`re not focused on your action and rhythm you can search for wickets...but to get one in the first over was a release," explained Broad, now an International Cricket Council match referee.

"Maybe it was meant to be that he comes to Trent Bridge and gets it here," said Broad senior, who scored three hundreds in England`s 1986/87 Ashes series win in Australia.

Broad`s haul, which saw him draw level with England fast bowling great Fred Trueman`s career Test tally of 307 wickets, was all the more impressive as England were without the injured James Anderson.

England`s all-time leading Test bowler with 413 wickets, Anderson was ruled out with a side injury suffered in the team`s eight-wicket win in the third Test at Edgbaston last week.Former England captain Michael Vaughan said Broad`s place in Ashes history was now assured. 

"Stuart Broad has just put himself into Ashes history," Vaughan said. 

"We all thought how are they going to cope without Jimmy Anderson and look what has happened.

"You are looking at the manner of the dismissals, Broad, (Steven) Finn and (Mark) Wood put the ball in the right area and I don`t think Australia played with any kind of confidence and the message soon spread. It was a minefield.

"Their head positions were so far off the line of the ball and the seam bowlers were just licking their lips and waiting for that error and they kept falling for it," added Vaughan, a former top-order batsman who led England to Ashes glory in 2005.

Meanwhile, Australia great Shane Warne said England deserved credit for maintaining their accuracy in front of a 17,000 capacity crowd.

"England were just absolutely superb, from the moment they won that toss and bowled first," said Warne, commentating for Sky Sports. 

"They were outstanding. It`s not often you have the perfect innings and England just did.

"I think Stuart Broad has probably been the best England bowler through this whole series," the legendary leg-spinner added.

"I still think Australia could have been more defensive and have better technique with some of the deliveries. 

"But this is why you heard from the England camp that `we want traditional English pitches`, and this is why," Warne said.

From Zee News

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