Eliud Kipchoge eyes marathon world record in Berlin

The men`s world marathon record threatens to fall for the eighth time in Berlin this Sunday with Kenya`s Eliud Kipchoge eyeing Dennis Kimetto`s mark, set last year in Germany`s capital.

AFP| Last Updated: Sep 25, 2015, 09:17 AM IST
Eliud Kipchoge eyes marathon world record in Berlin

Berlin: The men`s world marathon record threatens to fall for the eighth time in Berlin this Sunday with Kenya`s Eliud Kipchoge eyeing Dennis Kimetto`s mark, set last year in Germany`s capital.

Kimetto`s winning time of two hours, two minutes and 57 seconds shaved 26 seconds off the previous world record, set by his Kenyan compatriot Wilson Kipsang the year before in Berlin.

Kipchoge, 30, is using Berlin as a build-up to his assault on the Olympic marathon gold medal in Rio next August.

He is amongst the three Kenyans headliners along with training partner Emmanuel Mutai and 2012 Berlin winner Geoffrey Mutai.

All three are capable of running under 2:05 hours to attack the world record.

Kimetto is sitting out this year`s race to take part in Glasgow`s Great Scottish Run on October 4.

The relatively flat course over 42.195 kilometers (26 miles 385 yards) through the centre of Berlin has a reputation for speed and ten world records have fallen in the city -- seven in the men`s race and three in the women`s.

"If everything comes together in Berlin, something very special can happen," said Kipchoge, who led a Kenyan cleansweep in the men`s race at the London marathon in April.

"I`m convinced that Emmanuel Mutai and I can push on together towards a new world record."

Kipchoge, the 2008 Beijing 5000m Olympic silver medallist, has completed five marathons, only being beaten once -- by Wilson Kipsang as he set a then world record of 2:03:23 in Berlin in 2013. 

Kipochage gave a commanding display of long-distance running in London this year, but dismissed suggestions he had an easy time.

"The opposite was true. It was my most demanding marathon yet -- mentally, that is," he said.

"You needed to focus from start to finish and dealing with the pressure and whole situation was very difficult.

"Also, from 35 kilometres onwards every marathon is hard."

Kipchoge says he would have no problem to be beaten by his training partner, Mutai.

"Whoever is better on the day will win -- as simple as that," he said, but refused to be drawn as to what time will win this year`s race.