1st ODI: India vs New Zealand – Statistical highlights

Last Updated: Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 20:04

Napier: Statistical highlights of the first cricket one-dayer between India and New Zealand here on Sunday.

With Ross Taylor`s catch, Mahendra Singh Dhoni became become the first Indian wicketkeeper and the fourth in ODIs to complete 300 dismissals or more, joining Adam Gilchrist (472), Mark Bocher (424) and Kumar Sangakkara (424).

Dhoni became the third wicketkeeper to achieve the double of 5,000 runs and 300 dismissals. He has joined Adam Gilchrist (9410 runs + 472 dismissals in 282) and Kumar Sangakkara (11223 runs + 424 dismissals in 318).

Dhoni has taken 463 international catches - the joint fifth as wicketkeeper. The leading wicketkeepers with most catches are Boucher (952), Gilchrist (813), Healy (560), Sangakkara (484), Marsh (463) and Dhoni (463).

Virat Kohli`s first century in New Zealand on his first outing is his 18th in ODIs - his second against New Zealand.

Kohli (123 off 111 balls) has established an Indian record for registering the highest individual innings vs New Zealand at Napier in ODIs, eclipsing the 108 off 119 balls by Virender Sehwag on December 29, 2002. He has posted two centuries in a losing cause in ODIs - the first was 107 off 93 balls vs England at Cardiff on September 16, 2011.

Kohli, for the first time, has recorded a century in a losing cause while chasing in ODIs. His outstanding tally of 18 centuries in 119 innings is a record in ODIs, eclipsing Sourav Ganguly`s tally of reaching the feat in 174 innings.

Dhoni and Kohli were involved in a partnership of 95 - India`s highest fifth-wicket stand vs New Zealand in New Zealand, eclipsing the 78 between Virender Sehwag and Mohammad Kaif at McLean Park, Napier on December 29, 2002.

The above stand is the second highest for India against New Zealand for the fifth wicket, next only to the 107 between Dhoni and Sehwag at Dambulla on August 25, 2010.

Mohammad Shami (4/55) has recorded his best bowling performance in ODIs. He became the second Indian bowler to claim four wickets in an innings at Napier. Javagal Srinath had captured four for 52 on February 16, 1995.

Kane Williamson`s first fifty vs India is his seventh in ODIs. His superb knock is his second highest score in ODIs in New Zealand - the highest being 74 vs England at Hamilton on February 17, 2003.

India have lost four ODIs out of six contested vs New Zealand at McLean Park, Napier (won two).

New Zealand`s 24-run win is their first in seven ODIs against India.

New Zealand (292/7) have recorded their highest total vs India at Napier, outstripping the 254 for nine on December 29, 2002.

India (268) have recorded their highest losing total vs New Zealand in New Zealand in ODIs, eclipsing the 257 for five at Taupo on January 9, 1999.

Ross Taylor (55) has posted his 25th fifty in ODIs - his third vs India. He is averaging 48.02 in a winning cause in ODIs - 1921 runs in 57 ODIs, including three hundreds and 14 fifties.

Taylor (4,040 at an average of 38.47 in 121 innings) has become the ninth New Zealand batsman to amass 4,000 runs or more in ODIs.

Williamson and Taylor put on 121 - New Zealand`s first century stand for the third wicket against India in New Zealand in ODIs.

Corey Anderson (68 not out off 40 balls) has recorded his second highest score in ODIs behind the 131 not out vs West Indies at Queenstown on January 1, 2014.

Anderson has got his second Man of the Match award in ODIs. He had first received for recording an unbeaten 131 off 47 balls against West Indies at Queenstown on January 1, 2014.

Anderson has recorded strike rate of 170.00 during his unbeaten knock of 68 off 40 balls - the highest by a New Zealand player against India in ODIs (minimum 50).

Anderson and Ronchi have shared a partnership of 66 - New Zealand`s highest for the sixth wicket in ODIs at Napier.

Mitchell McClenaghan (4/68) has recorded his sixth instance of four wickets or more in an innings in Limited-Overs Internationals.

PTI

First Published: Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 20:04

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