Glioblastomas

Why brain tumours are more common in men

The absence of a protein known to reduce cancer risk can explain why brain tumours occur more often in males and are more harmful than similar tumours in females.

Aug 02, 2014, 14:29 PM IST

Human fat could help in treating brain cancer

Researchers have claimed that they have used stem cells derived from human body fat to treat brain cancer in mice.

May 04, 2014, 13:19 PM IST

Switch that controls aggressive brain tumour growth found

Scientists, including Indian-origin researchers, have identified a cellular switch that can be turned off and on to slow down and inhibit growth of the most common and aggressive malignant brain tumour.

Sep 22, 2013, 19:03 PM IST

Switch controlling growth of aggressive brain tumour cells identified

Researchers have identified a cellular switch that can be turned off and on, to slow down, and eventually restrict the growth of the most commonly diagnosed and aggressive malignant brain tumour.

Sep 21, 2013, 16:00 PM IST

Why brain tumours are so difficult to treat

Researchers including one of an Indian origin have found that the most common and aggressive brain tumour grows by turning normal brain cells into stem cells, which can continuously replicate and regrow a tumour with only a handful of cells left behind.

Oct 21, 2012, 18:16 PM IST

Bad cholesterol feeds brain tumours

Bad cholesterol fuels the growth of the commonest type of brain cancer, glioblastoma, just as hormones drive the growth of certain breast and prostate cancers.

Sep 16, 2011, 17:26 PM IST

`Natural stem cells attack glioblastomas`

An Indian-origin scientist finds how brain`s own stem cells control glioblastomas.

Jul 10, 2010, 11:57 AM IST

`Natural stem cells attack glioblastomas`

An Indian-origin scientist finds how brain`s own stem cells control glioblastomas.

Jul 10, 2010, 00:00 AM IST