Apes may learn behaviour needed for human speech
Apes may learn behaviour needed for human speech

Challenging the perception that humans are the only primates with the capacity for speech, new research has found that gorillas too can learn new vocal and breathing-related behaviours -- key requirements for human speech.

Brain's seat of speech shuts down when we talk
Brain's seat of speech shuts down when we talk

A brain area, long recognised as the command centre for human speech, actually shuts down when we talk, scientists have found.

Climate affects development of human speech

Finding a correlation between climate and the evolution of language, researchers say that languages with complex tones are much more likely to occur in the world's humid regions.

How human speech influences young infants

A new theory has suggested that human speech has a surprising influence on young infants.

Pooches understand what you say just as humans do
Pooches understand what you say just as humans do

A new study has revealed some of the first evidence of how dogs also differentiate and process those various components of human speech.

Speech requires both sides of brain

Humans need both sides of their brain for speech, according to a study today that could rewrite therapy for people verbally impaired by a stroke.

Soon, device that turns your dog`s thoughts into human speech

No more woof! Swedish researchers are developing the world`s first headset that can translate your pet dog`s thoughts into English words.

Primate calls help infants form `categories` just like human speech

A new research has found that for 3 and 4-month-old infants, non-human primate vocalizations promoted object categorization, mirroring exactly the effects of human speech, but that by six months, non-human primate vocalizations no longer had this effect.

Monkeys` lip-smacking sounds resemble human speech

The vocal lip-smacks that gelada monkeys use in friendly encounters have surprising similarities to human speech, a study has revealed.

Monkey lip smacks shed light on evolution of human speech

Scientists have supported the idea that human speech evolved less from vocalizations than from communicative facial gestures.