Ezetimibe can reduce cardiovascular problems, says new study

A new study has found that Ezetimibe can reduce the cardiovascular problems in diabetes patients. The drug achieved greater reductions in LDL cholesterol than statins alone, resulting in lower risks of cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes and the benefits observed in diabetics were greater than in those without diabetes.

Statins may trigger anger in women: Study

Statins, a highly popular class of drug used to manage blood cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease, have been found to trigger anger among women, says a new study.

Statins don't pose threat to your memory

If you are taking statins, there's no need to worry as a new study has suggested that the cholesterol-lowering drugs most likely do not cause short-term memory loss.Lead study author Brian L. Strom of Rutgers University said that limited previous studies and some statin-drug takers have anecdotally reported memory lapses after taking popular lipid-lowering drugs (LLDs) called statins. The result has been that some people have stopped taking their statins, inappropriately.The study compared new users of statins with people not taking statins. New statin users also were compared to a second control group - patients taking nonstatin LLDs, which had not been done before.More patients taking statins indeed reported memory loss in the 30-day period after first taking the drugs, compared to non-users, the study found. The same, however, was found with the nonstatin LLDs.Either it means that anything that lowers cholesterol has the same effect on short-term memory, which is not scientifically credible because you're dealing with drugs with completely different structures, Strom noted, adding that detection bias is more likely the reason, meaning patients taking a new drug visit their doctors more frequently and are highly attuned to their health.Strom added that when patients are put on statins or any new drug, they're seen more often by their doctor or they themselves are paying attention to whether anything is wrong. So if they have a memory problem, they're going to notice it.He continued that even if it has nothing to do with the drug, they're going to blame it on the drug.Strom concluded that people who have high cholesterol should be on statins, which include atorvastatin, cerivastatin, fluvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, while nonstatin LLDs include cholestyramine, colestipol hydrochloride, colesevelam, clofibrate and gemfibrozil, are a very effective therapy, which is very safe.The study appears in The Journal of the American Medical Association-Internal Medicine.

'Cholesterol drugs may reduce risk of cancer death'

Women who take cholesterol-lowering drugs might have a reduced risk of death caused by cancer, suggests a new study.

Statins can cut stroke risk by 30% in elderly

As per a new study, millions of people should be given wonderdrugs, which include statins and fibrates, as they can slash the stroke risk by a third in the elderly.

Statins strongly linked to increased diabetes risk

In a database study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, cholesterol-lowering drugs statins have been found to increase the risk of developing diabetes.

Use of statins linked to reduced death from lung cancer

Sceintists have shown that prolonged use of statins may reduce the risk of death from lung cancer.

Cholesterol-lowering drug may curb lung cancer death risk

Prolonged use of statins, a cholesterol-lowering drug, may lower risk of death from lung cancer, new research has found.

Here's when to take statins or not

A new study has offered clinicians tips to help patients make the right call whether to use cholesterol-lowering statins or not.

Statins elevate risk of diabetes by 46%

Use of statins can increase the risk of developing diabetes by 46 percent, even after adjustment for confounding factors, claims a new study.

Safety, efficacy of statins exaggerated: Study

Statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective or as safe as we have been led to believe, warn US researchers.

'Wonder drugs' statins 'not as effective or safe' as we have been led to believe

A new study has revealed that safety and life-saving efficacy of statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, have been exaggerated.

Statins may not lower Parkinson's risk: Study

Use of statins may not be associated with reduced risk of Parkinson's disease, a new study has found.

Taking statins in 30s can help prevent heart disease later in life

Scientists have claimed that adults between the ages of 35 and 55 with even slightly high cholesterol are at risk of facing heart disease later in life.

Statins may not really be memory-impairing drugs

a new research, which suggests that drugs for high cholesterol or statins don't really impair memory and cognitive function, has cast doubts on the cautionary stance taken by the US Food and Drug Agency (FDA).

Statins can reduce heart disease risk in women

Statin treatment can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in women just as it does in men, a large new international study has found.

Statins as effective for women as men for cutting heart disease, stroke risk

Statins are not just good for men, as a new study has shown that they also helps slash risk of heart disease or stroke in women.

Statins not linked with reduced fracture risk

Contrary to prevalent suggestions that statin users may have a reduced risk of fractures, researchers have found that treatment with an anti-cholesterol medicine did not reduce the risk of fracture among men and women.

New test to spot what makes a good drug

A new test could revolutionise the discovery of new prescription drugs by determining which drugs are unlikely to work at an early stage.

Benefits of statins slightly outweigh diabetes risk

A new study has revealed the benefits of taking cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins are far greater than the risks and the diabetes risk of taking the drug was "small".