Soham Shah's horror fantasy Tumbbad sees a jump on day 4

Mixing elements of fantasy and horror, 'Tumbbad' is a thrilling experience that questions the roots of human greed while providing entertainment. 

Soham Shah's horror fantasy Tumbbad sees a jump on day 4

New Delhi: Soham Shah's historical horror-fantasy drama 'Tumbbad' released across theatres on October 12. The film, which saw an average start with an opening of Rs 65 lakhs, has witnessed a slight increase in earnings. 

As per industry experts, the positive word of mouth has helped the film fetch good numbers. Trade analyst Taran Adarsh shared the latest business collection of the film writing, "#Tumbbad has a steady Day 4, collecting marginally more than Day 1... Fri 65 lakhs, Sat 1.15 cr, Sun 1.45 cr, Mon 70 lakhs. Total: ₹ 3.95 cr. India biz." 

Mixing elements of fantasy and horror, 'Tumbbad' is a thrilling experience that questions the roots of human greed while providing entertainment. 

The film is directed by debutant Rahi Anil Barve and Adesh Prasad and is jointly produced by Sohum Shah, Aanand L. Rai, Mukesh Shah and Amita Shah. The plot revolves around the consequences when humans build a temple for her first-born. Set in Pune in the 1920s, it revolves around three generations of a brahmin family.

Rahi Anil Barve, who is the co-director of 'Tumbbad', said that the title is derived from Shripad Narayan Pendse's marathi novel 'Tumbadche Khot.' He said that he had written the first draft in 1997, when he was 18 years old. From 2009 to 2010, he created a 700 page storyboard within 8 months, which he said was the "anchor on which everything was based." 

He managed to get a producer who backed out in 2008. In the monsoon of 2012, he managed to get finances and the principal photography started. He said: "we shot in the rain at age-old locations, where no human had ventured for at least a 100 years. For me, Tumbbads locations, the feel of its stuffy air, and the lonely rainy atmosphere that defies the feeling of time’s passage is as central as its characters".

The film has minimal dialogues and was shot with constant physical movement with few cuts. Shah, the lead of the film, gained 8 kilogram's of weight for the role of a wrestler. Since the production took six years, Shah maintained his role's look for that entire period.

It is the first Indian film to be screened at Venice International Film Festival.