Eid-ul-Fitr 2020: This is how Eid is celebrated across the globe!

Eid-ul-Fitr is the first and only day in the month of Shawwal during which Muslims are not permitted to fast. The day and date of Eid may vary depending upon different time zones and moon sighting. 

Eid-ul-Fitr 2020: This is how Eid is celebrated across the globe!
Pic Courtesy: IANS

New Delhi: The Islamic holy month of Ramadan or Ramzan comes to an end with Eid-ul-Fitr, also known as Eid-al-Fitr in many places. With Eid-ul-Fitr or Eid-al-Fitr, the 30-day long period of fasting (also known as Rozas) comes to an end. Muslims across the globe celebrate the day with much gusto and fervour. 

Eid-ul-Fitr is the first and only day in the month of Shawwal during which Muslims are not permitted to fast. The day and date of Eid may vary depending upon different time zones and moon sighting. 

ALSO READ: Eid-ul-Fitr 2020: India timings, moon sighting and here's when the country will celebrate Eid

However, due to the deadly novel coronavirus outbreak, this time festivities might have a new way of celebrations. With people confined to their homes and social distancing the new norm, spending time with family at home can be a new way of expressing gratitude and celebrating the essence of the festival worldwide.

ALSO READ: Eid-ul-Fitr 2020: Top WhatsApp, Facebook and Text messages to wish your loved ones!

The crescent moon was not sighted in Saudi Arabia on Friday, May 22, 2020, therefore Eid will be celebrated in Gulf countries on May 24 - Sunday. 

Here's how Muslims celebrate Eid-ul-Fitr across the globe: 

After waking up early in the morning and taking a shower, everyone gets dressed up in new clothes. 

Men join community prayers which are conducted either in an open field or a large hall, while women offer their prayers with their folks at home. But this time because of the deadly novel coronavirus outbreak, gatherings might be avoided and social distancing practised.

Muslims believe in giving Zakat al-Fitr to the poor which means giving charity to the needy towards the end of the holy month of Ramadan or Ramzan.

People then exchange gifts with family, friends and greet each other with the grace of Allah by wishing 'Eid Mubarak'!

After greeting and embracing each other, people gorge on sweet vermicelli (mithi sewayian),  an Eid speciality.

Also, children in the house are given Eidi (gifts or money) by elders or visiting guests and this brings joy in the faces of the little kids waiting eagerly for their presents.

Ramadan word has Arabic root ramiḍa or ar-ramaḍ, which means scorching heat or dryness. It is believed that the holy book of Quran was written during this month. Thus, the people practise fasting in this month to purify their souls and seek forgiveness from the Almighty Allah.

Eid Mubarak to all everyone!