Eye on Olympics but can't fulfil formalities anymore: Vijender Singh

Boxer Vijender Singh, who became the first Indian boxer to win an Olympic medal at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, has expressed his desire to represent India in the Olympics again after the International Boxing Association's (AIBA) relaxation of rules pertaining to professionals competing at the Olympics. Vijender had turned professional in June 2015.

Eye on Olympics but can't fulfil formalities anymore: Vijender Singh

New Delhi: Boxer Vijender Singh said that while he is hoping to make it to his fourth Olympics in Tokyo next year, he may not be able to fulfil the requirements of the Boxing Federation of India which requires him to spend significant time in the national camp.

The 34-year-old, who became the first Indian boxer to win an Olympic medal at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, has expressed his desire to represent India in the Olympics again after the International Boxing Association's (AIBA) relaxation of rules pertaining to professionals competing at the Olympics. Vijender had turned professional in June 2015.

"I will try my best to reach the Tokyo Olympics but there are many terms and conditions, you have to stay in the camp for two, two-and-a-half months and a number of other formalities are involved," Vijender told reporters on the sidelines of the launch of badminton ace Jwala Gutta's academy.

"I have done all that in the past, now I cannot fulfil all these conditions. I believe in straight talk, I do not like beating around the bush. Have 2-3 trials, if I go through, then fine, or else come back," Vijender said.

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The ace pugilist also said that his team is looking to arrange his next bout in Dubai next year. He had extended his professional record to 12 wins by beating Ghanaian former Commonwealth champion Charles Adamu in the same city on November 22.

Vijender also hailed the World Anti-Doping Agency's decision to ban Russia from international sporting events for covering up a widespread doping scandal.

"It's a good thing, penalties need to be imposed on those who do wrong by the game. They have sent a straight forward message that whoever violates WADA's rules, will face the consequences," he said.