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Pakistan PM Imran Khan's speech at 50 minutes longest at UNGA 2019

While Imran Khan's speech was the longest, Rwanda President Paul Kagame delivered the shortest speech as he spoke for just seven minutes. 

Pakistan PM Imran Khan's speech at 50 minutes longest at UNGA 2019

New Delhi: Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan's maiden speech at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in New York in September went on for 50 minutes, far exceeding the 15-20 minute time limit which a world leader is given to address the global body.   

While Imran's speech was the longest, Rwanda President Paul Kagame delivered the shortest speech as he spoke for just seven minutes. 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi too delivered his maiden speech at the UNGA after coming to power for the second time. He spoke for 16 minutes about India's development agenda, steps being taken by his government to fight climate change and presented a roadmap for world peace and stability.

He did not mention Pakistan in his address and instead highlighted India's contributions to the global community and the UN. 

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Imran, on the other hand, continued his anti-India rant while addressing the 74th UNGA session. He made India the centre of his speech at the global platform by bringing up the Central government's decision to abrogate Article 370 in Jammu and Kashmir. Though India has repeatedly said that Kashmir is its internal matter. 

The red light constantly blinked as the Pakistan PM continued his vile narrative against India.  He spoke on money laundering, climate change and Islamophobia, apart from raking up the Kashmir issue. He also warned of what he called "bloodbath" in Jammu and Kashmir ever since India abrogated Article 370 that granted special status in the region.

After Imran's speech, India used the Right to Reply option to respond to his anti-India rhetoric.

In a strongly-worded statement, Vidisha Maitra, First Secretary Ministry of External Affairs, while exercising India's right of reply, said that Imran's threat of nuclear war qualifies as 'brinksmanship'.

"Rarely has the General Assembly witnessed such misuse, rather abuse, of an opportunity to reflect," she said, adding that the choice of his words attacking India, like "pogrom", "bloodbath", "racial superiority", "pick up the gun" and "fight to the end" reflect a medieval mindset and not a 21st century vision.

She also asked if Pakistan would acknowledge its position as the "only government in the world that provides pension to an individual listed by the UN."