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Cricket Australia chief executive Kevin Roberts open to the idea of four-day Tests

At the same time, he denied any reports suggesting the fact that Australia had attempted to doctor the Perth wicket for the second Test against India. 

Cricket Australia chief executive Kevin Roberts open to the idea of four-day Tests
Image Courtesy: Twitter/@ICC

Cricket Australia chief executive Kevin Roberts has indicated a favourable outlook towards the idea of conducting four-day Test matches in the coming months despite not having any immediate plans to follow suit. 

"There's a bit to be said for it," Roberts told SEN.

"It's certainly something we need to be open minded to down the track. The average duration of a Test match is a shade over four days."

"We know there's been timeless Tests over the years, we know there were even three-day Tests. So Test cricket hasn't been five days in duration forever."

"And I think the concepts of four days going forward is something we need to be open to, without jumping to conclusions," he added. 

South Africa defeated Zimbabwe within just two days of the inaugral four-day Test between the two nations which was conducted last December. 

Ireland and England are all set to battle it out in a four-day Test next year in July, setting the stage for further contests of this nature. 

At the same time, he denied any reports suggesting the fact that Australia had attempted to doctor the Perth wicket for the second Test against India. 

"Certainly not. There were photos in local media of Justin (Langer) checking out the wicket with the curator the other day," said Roberts.

"But you don't prepare a Test match wicket over the course of three or four days, it's done over months. The nature of the deck couldn't be influenced over the last few days."

"There's no instruction to say it should play this way or that way. It's essentially a good contest between bat and ball that's consistent with the characteristics of each venue. That's as far as it goes."

"The right thing for cricket doesn't necessarily mean we're producing conditions that mean our teams are a walk-up start to beat our visiting opposition," concluded Roberts.