Scottish film students work on Shahid starrer `Mausam`

Updated: Jun 30, 2010, 10:43 AM IST

London: Students from Edinburgh Napier University`s Screen Academy in Scotland are currently working with an Indian film crew for the shooting of `Mausam`, which stars actor Shahid Kapoor and is directed by his father, Pankaj Kapoor.

The shooting of the movie, in which Pankaj Kapoor debuts as director, was delayed for over a month in May because of the ash clouds following a volcanic eruption in Iceland.

The Edinburgh City Chambers threw a reception for the team and the Napier students to celebrate the collaboration, according to the New Scotsman newspaper.

Councillor Steve Cardownie said on the occasion: "It`s very fitting that Scotland`s capital should be at the centre of new and better connections between our filmmakers and those from other nations."

The Scottish government recently launched its India plan to encourage links between India and Scotland. As part of an exchange programme, a group of Napier students have already visited Kolkata to work on a script they had written under the programme.

The exchange with the Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute (SRFTI) was designed to reflect the different working traditions of the two countries. During a first trip last November, two staff and four students worked with students at the SRFTI to make the short film "Tuki", which was written by Napier student Gayle Baird and featured Bengali actors.

Four SRFTI students are now in Edinburgh to help work on "Mausam", about an Indian boy who leaves his life - and girlfriend - in Scotland to fight in the Indian Air Force during the Kargil war with Pakistan. Filming is currently taking place at various locations across Edinburgh, including Portobello Cemetery and Colinton.

Robin MacPherson, director of Screen Academy Scotland, said: "The connection we established on our first visit to Kolkata in November 2008 has blossomed into an exciting creative collaboration between Scotland and West Bengal where we are able to share ideas."

IANS

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