High-fiber diet ‘cuts heart disease risk’

High-fiber diet could be a critical heart-healthy lifestyle change young people can make.

Washington: Scientists have found that a high-fiber diet could be a critical heart-healthy lifestyle change young and middle-aged adults can make.

The study from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine found adults between 20 and 59 years old with the highest fiber intake had a significantly lower estimated lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease compared to those with the lowest fiber intake.

For the study, Hongyan Ning, lead author and a statistical analyst in the department of preventive medicine at Feinberg, examined data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a nationally representative sample of about 11,000 adults.

Ning considered diet, blood pressure, total cholesterol, smoking status and history of diabetes in survey participants and then used a formula to predict lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease.

“The results are pretty amazing. Younger (20 to 39 years) and middle-aged (40 to 59 years) adults with the highest fiber intake, compared to those with the lowest fiber intake, showed a statistically significant lower lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease,” said Ning.

However, in adults 60 to 79 years, dietary fiber intake was not significantly associated with a reduction in lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease.

It’s possible that the beneficial effect of dietary fiber may require a long period of time to achieve, and older adults may have already developed significant risk for heart disease before starting a high-fiber diet, according to Ning.

As for young and middle-aged adults, now is the time to start making fiber a big part of your daily diet, said Ning.

ANI

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