Stop politicising my father's death, please don't harass us: Justice BH Loya's son

  The family of late Special CBI judge BH Loya on Sunday said that it was deeply pained with the chain of events and intense politics over his death.

Stop politicising my father's death, please don't harass us: Justice BH Loya's son
Image Credit: ANI

NEW DELHI:  The family of Special CBI judge BH Loya, who allegedly died under mysterious circumstances, on Sunday said that it was deeply pained with the chain of events and intense politics over his mysterious death.

Addressing a press conference in the national capital, Anuj Loya, the son of the late CBI judge said, ''Our family is deeply pained with the chain of events in past few days.''

A teary-eyed Anuj said that his family has no suspicions now regarding the death, but they are being "harassed" and "victimised".

“We have no suspicion over father's death now. We had suspicion earlier but it is over now,'' Anuj said.

Anuj also made an appeal to the political parties and the NGOs to stop "harassing" his family over his father's death. 

''Please don't harass us anymore,'' the teenager said.

Loya's lawyer Ameet Naik, who was also present during the press conference, added, "There is no conspiracy... we don't want to be victims of any political issue. The family has no complaints against anyone".

Death of BH Loya - the judge who was hearing the Sohrabuddin fake encounter case - in December 2014, found mention in the open press conference held recently by top four judges of the Supreme Court - Chelameswar, Ranjan Gogoi, Madan B Lokur and Kurian Joseph – during which they attacked the Chief Justice over allocation of cases and alleged faulty administration of the top court.

The 48-year-old judge - who was hearing the CBI's case of murder against BJP chief Amit Shah - had died of a cardiac arrest in Nagpur, where he had gone to attend a wedding on December 1, 2014. 

Shah and several top police officers were subsequently cleared by a court.

Recently, in an interview to a news magazine, some members of the judge's family had called the death unnatural, triggering calls from various quarters about an independent inquiry.

Earlier this morning, four retired judges, including an ex-Supreme Court judge, wrote an open letter to the Chief Justice of India, saying they agree with the issues raised by the four apex court judges over the allocation of cases and the crisis needs to be resolved "within the judiciary".

The letter penned by former apex court judge PB Sawant, ex-chief justice of Delhi High Court AP Shah, former Madras High Court judge K Chandru and ex-Bombay High Court judge H Suresh was released to the media. However, it was also widely shared on the social media.

Justice Shah confirmed having written an open letter along with the other retired judges to the reporters. "We have written the open letter which the other judges named in the letter have also consented to," Shah said. 

He said that the view expressed by the retired judges is "quite similar to the views of the Supreme Court Bar Association (SCBA) that till this crisis is resolved, the important matters should be listed before a five-judge Constitution bench of senior judges".

Justice Shah said that earlier he was not sure about the consent given by the other three judges and, therefore, he initially denied having written any letter but now all of them have given consent to it.

"The four senior Judges of the Supreme Court have brought to light a serious issue regarding the manner of allocation of cases, particularly sensitive cases, to various benches of the Supreme Court,'' the four retired judges were reportedly said in the letter.

"They have expressed a grave concern that cases are not being allocated in a proper manner and are being allocated arbitrarily to particularly designated benches, often headed by junior judges, in an arbitrary manner. This is having a very deleterious effect on the administration of justice and the rule of law," the letter further said.

The four retired judges said that they agree with the four judges of top court that though the CJI is the master of roster and can designate benches for allocation of work but this does not mean that it can be done in an "arbitrary manner" such that, "sensitive and important cases" are sent to "hand-picked benches" of junior judges by the chief justice.

(With Agency inputs)