Shoaib Malik’s ban can be lifted soon: PCB
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Last Updated: Tuesday, April 06, 2010, 09:45
  
Zeecric Bureau

New Delhi: Pakistani cricketer Shoaib Malik’s cricket ban could be lifted soon, as per PCB’s latest news. He was recently banned for a year by the apex body which seems to be handing him out a marriage gift by telling him to don the nation’s colours again, reports suggested.

Things have been turbulent for the cricketer as reports suggested that he would go for an anticipatory bail as he would be questioned again on Tuesday. This came after Ayesha told the police that she had evidence of her pregnancy.

The police on Monday had grilled Malik in the wake of criminal cases lodged against him by the father of Ayesha, the Hyderabad girl who claims to be his wife.

A police team led by an assistant commissioner of police (ACP) quizzed 28-year-old Shoaib for close to two hours at the residence of tennis star 23-year-old Sania Mirza, to whom he is scheduled to get married on April 15.

The Hyderabad Police have recorded the ace cricketer’s statement and have also impounded his passport. He has also been asked not to leave Hyderabad city limits till the investigations are on.

Sources told Zee News that Shoaib was quizzed on these points:

  • Did you stay with Ayesha in Hotel Taj Residency in Hyderabad in 2005?

  • Did you meet her in Dubai?

  • Did you attend a party at Ayesha's residence along with his team members?

  • Did you try to bribe Ayesha into silence?

  • Who all were the witnesses to your telephonic nikah with Ayesha?

  • He was also shown some CDs, and pictures which feature him along with Ayesha.

    Although, there was no official word on the questioning, but reports said that Shoaib has claimed that the signature on the Nikahnama –being presented as proof of marriage by Ayesha - was forged.

    Meanwhile, there are reports that the Pakistani High Commission in India has also decided to step and provide legal assistance to Shoaib, if the need be.


    First Published: Tuesday, April 06, 2010, 09:45


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