Drought-tolerant crops coming closer to reality

Last Updated: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 - 10:39

Washington: A team of plant cell biologists has discovered a way to help plants survive drought.
When a plant encounters drought, it does its best to cope with this stress by activating a set of protein molecules called receptors. These receptors, once activated, turn on processes that help the plant survive the stress.

Now, the team from the University of California has discovered how to rewire this cellular machinery to heighten the plants’ stress response – a finding that can be used to engineer crops to give them a better shot at surviving and displaying increased yield under drought conditions.

The discovery, made in the laboratory of Sean Cutler, an associate professor of plant cell biology at the University of California, Riverside, brings drought-tolerant crops a step closer to becoming a reality.

When plants encounter drought, they naturally produce abscisic acid, a stress hormone that helps them cope with the drought conditions. Specifically, the hormone turns on receptors in the plants, resulting in a suite of beneficial changes that help the plants survive.

These changes typically include guard cells closing on leaves to reduce water loss, cessation of plant growth to reduce water consumption and myriad other stress-relieving responses.

Working on Arabidopsis, a model plant used widely in plant biology labs, the Cutler-led research team has now succeeded supercharging the plant``s stress response pathway by modifying the abscisic acid receptors so that they can be turned on at will and stay on.

“Receptors are the cell’s conductors and the abscisic acid receptors orchestrate the specific symphony that elicits stress tolerance,” said Cutler, a member of UC Riverside’s Institute for Integrative Genome Biology.

“We’ve now figured out how to turn the orchestra on at will,” he stated.

Study results will appear in Dec. 20 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

ANI



First Published: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 - 10:39

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