UN chief asks India, Pakistan, six others to ratify CTBT

UN chief Ban Ki-moon has called on India, Pakistan and six other nations to ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, saying that the entry-into-force of the Treaty is an essential building block to achieve a world free of nuclear weapons.

United Nations: UN chief Ban Ki-moon has called on India, Pakistan and six other nations to ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, saying that the entry-into-force of the Treaty is an essential building block to achieve a world free of nuclear weapons.

"On this International Day, I repeat my call on all remaining States to sign and ratify the Treaty ? especially the eight necessary for its entry-into-force: China, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan and the United States," Ban said in his remarks to the informal meeting of the General Assembly to observe the International Day against Nuclear Tests.

The Secretary General said the entry-into-force of the Treaty is an essential building block for achieving the goal of a world free of nuclear weapons.

"The best way to honour the victims of past tests is to prevent any in the future. Today let us also send a strong signal that the international community stands united to take action that will lead us to a safer and more secure world ? a world free of nuclear weapons," he said here today.

The CTBT is a legally-binding, verifiable means by which to constrain the quantitative and qualitative development of nuclear weapons.

While he welcomed the voluntary moratoria on testing imposed by many nuclear-armed States, Ban said moratorium are no substitute for a CTBT in force.

The three nuclear tests conducted by North Korea are proof of this.

"Almost two decades after the CTBT was negotiated, it is long past time for the treaty to enter-into-force... It is our shared responsibility to ensure that nuclear tests are relegated to history. Let us spare no effort to take this next critical step on the road to a nuclear-weapon-free world," he said.

 

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