Roy Keane's book 'unnecessary', says ex-United captain Bryan Robson

Roy Keane’s autobiography, with its criticism of major figures at Manchester United, was unnecessary and the prevalence of such books unwelcome, according to former captain Bryan Robson.

Roy Keane's book 'unnecessary', says ex-United captain Bryan Robson
Republic of Ireland assistant manager Roy Keane, center, smiles ahead of their Euro 2016 group D qualifying soccer match against Gibraltar at Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014

London: Roy Keane’s autobiography, with its criticism of major figures at Manchester United, was unnecessary and the prevalence of such books unwelcome, according to former captain Bryan Robson.

“Is it necessary? If you are going to come about with a book, why not talk about the history of what you have done in the game, the good things about the game, rather than criticise people when there is no need to criticise people,” Robson said at the Soccerex Americas Forum in Barbados on Wednesday.

“Roy is just an example. There are a lot of people doing that, they come out and criticise people in their books -- is there any need especially when you are making a great living out of the sport anyway?"

Keane makes some jibes at his former team mates in his recently published book `The Second Half` and also reveals disputes within the United dressing room.

“I think with the players of today and the standard and the money they receive, I don’t see why you write a controversial book and criticise people when you are only maybe doing it for the money,” added Robson.

“If you are doing a constructive book for the good of the game, which has given you a great career, then go and write a book, talk about your memories, your great times but these people who go and write just criticising people to be controversial, to sell more books and make more money, no I’m not for that."

Keane, currently assistant manager with Aston Villa and Ireland, was critical of his former manager Alex Ferguson, who was disparaging about the Irishman in his own book last year.

Former England international John Barnes said the published pot-shots were unwelcome.

“I really believe from a footballing perspective all the experiences that we have had ... what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas,” said the ex-Liverpool winger.

“So in terms of writing a book just from a sensationalist point of view, I wouldn’t do that. Everyone is different though. 

“Sir Alex Ferguson’s book and Roy Keane’s book, after everything that they have achieved and the people that have helped them to achieve that, to be criticising a lot of people now is not good,” he said.

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