`Lack of sunlight ups risk of diabetes`

London: Lack of sunlight is putting millions of people in danger of developing type 2 diabetes as they do not have enough vitamin D, a new study has claimed.

The Australian study, which is based on blood tests of over 5,000 people, found that people with good amount of vitamin D were less likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

The findings could play a major role in combating the condition which has been increasing in recent years, the researchers at Melbourne Pathology said.

Although plenty of exercise and a good diet can help prevent diabetes, the researchers said their study suggests that lack of enough sunshine could also be a contributory
factor, the Daily Mail reported.

For their study, the researchers tested the blood of 5,200 people and established that for every extra 25 nanomoles of vitamin D in the blood the chance of getting diabetes was
reduced by 24 per cent

Study co-author Dr Ken Sikaris said: "It`s hard to underestimate how important this could be."

According to the researchers, people who have less than 50 nanomoles of vitamin D per litre have a deficiency.

If the link is fully established between vitamin D and diabetes, those at risk could take dietary supplements to reduce the chance of getting the disease, they said.

A lack of sunshine -- and a lack of vitamin D – is estimated to cause 600,000 cases of cancer each year.

Dr Victoria King, from Diabetes UK, said: "It is not possible to recommend supplements to reduce the risk based on the result of this study and people should not see it as a quick fix.

"Diabetes UK is funding research at Glasgow University to help establish if people with Type 2 diabetes might benefit from vitamin D supplements.

"Until we know more, maintaining a healthy weight by keeping to a healthy diet and undertaking regular physical activity is the best way to reduce the risk."

PTI

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