Humidity sapping your energy? Researchers develop gel to convert moisture to electricity

The hydrogel could possibly bring down humidity levels in a room by 20% in minutes and also produce electricity to power small devices.

Humidity sapping your energy? Researchers develop gel to convert moisture to electricity
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Soaring temperatures can have a detrimental impact on human body and coupled with high humidity levels, causes fatigue - especially in tropical countries. There may soon, however, be a very simple and cost-effective way to beat the heat and humidity with researchers in Singapore developing a special gel that soaks moisture and converts it into electricity.

According to South China Morning Post, a team of four researchers at the National University of Singapore have developed a gel that, when applied to windows or walls, can reduce humidity in a room by 20% in just a few minutes. The gel is reportedly eight times more absorbent than any dehumidifying substance currently known or in use. It is also unique because it can be easily applied around a room to not just soak in moisture but possibly even block some of the sun's rays.

That it does not need an external power supply like traditional air-conditioners and other dehumidifying devices further adds to its list of merits. The biggest highlight though may well be the fact that these hydrogel could produce as much electricity as a regular AA battery.

The team that has developed the hydrogel has said that it took the members close to a year and a half to put out the product. Now, studies to ascertain where and to what scale can these hydrogels be used is going to be conducted and commercial sales may follow after it.

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