Climate change causing global sea levels to rise rapidly every year

Continuous emissions of greenhouse gases are warming the Earth's atmosphere and oceans and melting its ice, causing the rate of sea level rise to increase.

Climate change causing global sea levels to rise rapidly every year
(Representational image)

New Delhi: Satellite data has revealed that global sea levels are increasing rapidly due to climate change.

The study which analyzed satellite data said that climate change has accelerated sea level rise and the rate at which it is rising is increasing every year.

Researchers, led by the University of Colorado-Boulder professor of aerospace engineering sciences Steve Nerem, used the data dating back to 1993 to observe the levels of the world's oceans, reports CNN.

Using satellite data rather than tide-gauge data that is normally used to measure sea levels allows for more precise estimates of global sea level since it provides measurements of the open ocean.

The team observed a total rise in the ocean of 7 cm in 25 years of data, which aligns with the generally accepted current rate of sea level rise of about 3 mm per year, according to a study released on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

But that rate was not constant.

Continuous emissions of greenhouse gases are warming the Earth's atmosphere and oceans and melting its ice, causing the rate of sea level rise to increase, CNN reported.

"This acceleration, driven mainly by accelerated melting in Greenland and Antarctica, has the potential to double the total sea level rise by 2100 as compared to projections that assume a constant rate, to more than 60 cm instead of about 30," said Nerem.

Sea level rise of 65 cm would cause significant problems for coastal cities around the world. Extreme water levels, such as high tides and surges from strong storms, would be made exponentially worse.

The discourse on climate change and global warming has taken over a larger domain in the last few years and its rapidly growing effects have raised questions on Earth's habitability in the future.

A previous study had said that unabated climate change could severely affect the future growth of these countries, reverse current development gains, and degrade the quality of life.

(With IANS inputs)

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