Dawood Ibrahim, Chhota Shakeel ensured maximum crowd at Yakub Memon's funeral

Underworld don Dawood Ibrahim ensured maximum crowd at 1993 Mumbai serial blasts convict Yakub Memon's funeral, who was executed at Nagpur Central Prison on July 30, a newspaper report said on Saturday.

Updated: Aug 08, 2015, 12:17 PM IST
Dawood Ibrahim, Chhota Shakeel ensured maximum crowd at Yakub Memon's funeral

Mumbai: Underworld don Dawood Ibrahim ensured maximum crowd at 1993 Mumbai serial blasts convict Yakub Memon's funeral, who was executed at Nagpur Central Prison on July 30, a newspaper report said on Saturday.

According to the Times Of India report, Dawood, 1993 Mumbai bomb blast accused, had ordered his supporters to be present at Yakub's funeral.

Quoting some police sources the newspaper stated that Dawood and his close aide Chhota Shakel had telephoned all their loyalists in Mumbai asking them to be present at Yakub's funeral to show solidarity.

Police sources say Dawood's diktat was the main reason behind 10,000 strong crowd gathering at Marine Lines graveyard for the Mumbai blasts convict's last rites.

Over 30,000 personnel of Mumbai police, under the supervision of senior officers including City Police Commissioner Rakesh Maria, had been deployed both at Mahim and the Marine Lines graveyard.

According to a report published on Friday in a leading daily, The Economic Times, Tiger Memon, the man solely responsible for the Mumbai carnage, talked to his family members in Mumbai and pledged to avenge his younger brother Yakub's execution by the Government of India.

Amid unprecedented security, the Government of India, on July 30, executed Yakub Memon, a former accountant, who was convicted of involvement in a series of co-ordinated terrorist attacks that killed hundreds of people in Mumbai in 1993.

Yakub Memon died at 7 am at Nagpur jail in the western state of Maharashtra, according to a press briefing by the authorities later.

The Supreme Court of India had in the early hours of July 30 rejected a last-minute request for a two-week postponement of the execution to allow the condemned man to “make his peace with God and settle his earthly affairs before leaving this world”.