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Peace Party demands speedy resolution in Netaji's death

The Peace Party of India (PPI) on Saturday demanded the Centre to ensure speedy resolution of the mystery behind the death of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose.



Lucknow: The Peace Party of India (PPI) on Saturday demanded the Centre to ensure speedy resolution of the mystery behind the death of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose.

Party MLA Akhilesh Singh held Congress and its leaders responsible for complicating the mystery behind his death, and alleged that two of the leader's family members were spied upon for 23 years.

"British or US never said that Bose was killed in plane crash, but the first PM Jawahar Lal Nehru had repeatedly said that Netaji died in the crash in Taiwan. In a reply to a letter written by Anuj Dhar in the year 2005, Taiwanese government denied any such incident. Later, it was said that Netaji died in Russia," he said.

Presenting some documents of National Archives, Singh alleged that Nehru got Bose's nephews - Amiyanath Bose and Shishir Bose - spied on for 23 years assuming that a missing person remains in contact with his family.

He alleged that information collected through spying was sent to London.

The MLA said that he would file defamation case against the then government and Congress in this regard.

The party leader announced it will organise rally in Rae Bareli on 118th birth anniversary of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose on January 23 to create pressure on the government.

Similar rallies would be organised across the country and the Central government would be demanded to get the issue resolved with Russian government, Singh said.  

From Zee News

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