close
This ad will auto close in 10 seconds

Smriti Irani seeks explanation from CBSE over spelling mistakes

 Union HRD Minister Smriti Irani on Friday sought an explanation from CBSE over the spelling mistakes in a congratulatory letter send on her behalf to a school teacher for the good results in the board exams.



New Delhi: Union HRD Minister Smriti Irani on Friday sought an explanation from CBSE over the spelling mistakes in a congratulatory letter send on her behalf to a school teacher for the good results in the board exams.

The letter sent by the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) went viral soon after the teacher -- Richa Kumar of DPS Bhilai -- posted it in social media, prompting instant reactions from cross sections of the society.

The Minister's name is spelt incorrectly in Hindi as well as the words "minister" and "sansadhan (in Hindi)".

"I have sought an explanation from CBSE as there was spelling mistakes in some of the letters," she told reporters.

CBSE has apologised for the mistake.

Stung by the errors, she also tweeted "would not mis spell my own name in Hindi. Have asked concerned organisation to give an explanation".

Congratulatory letters are sent by the HRD Minister every year to the top performers of CBSE board examinations as well as to teachers.

"Thank you for congratulating me on the excellence I exemplify. However, having been a teacher for the last twenty years, your official letter head is an affront to my sensibilities as a Language teacher.

The attached photographs are self explanatory. Please ensure that at least the people who work for you, in your ministry, are well educated," Kumar said in her Facebook posting.

From Zee News

0 Comment - Join the Discussions

trending

photo gallery

video

DNA EXCLUSIVES

BHU row: When did protest against molestation become anti-national?

In the shoes of the Governor

DNA Edit | Power points: Swaraj’s speech breached through Pakistan’s bulwark

The terrible track record of land governance in India

Safeguarding India's heritage: DNA takes a look at Ministry of Culture