Submerged temples rise after more than three decades in Maharashtra

Several temples have resurfaced for the first time after over three decades along the stretches of the Godavari passing through Chandori village.

Updated: Mar 27, 2016, 10:44 AM IST
Submerged temples rise after more than three decades in Maharashtra
Picture for representation

Chandori: Several temples have resurfaced for the first time after over three decades along the stretches of the Godavari passing through Chandori village.

The village is around 25 km from Nashik and stretches of Godavari have dried up because of the ongoing drought in regions of Maharashtra.

As per a report in The Times of India, the last time the villagers had seen some of these temples was way back in 1982.

This was when Nashik had witnessed a drought of this scale. 

The report also said that the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) has no record of these ancient temples.

The only mention of these structures and the ghats along the Godavari could be found in the Nashik Gazetteer dating back to the British era.

"I saw these temples for the first time in my life," said Sandeep Tarle, sarpanch of Chandori was quoted by the Daily as saying.

"Usually during summer, we can see the pinnacles of the temples or their side walls because the shrines are under the river water across the year. The elderly in the village recall having seen the temples in 1982 when the region was hit by a drought," he added.

The shrines used to be a part of the ghats constructed by Sardar Hingne and Vinchurkar, the ministers of the Peshwas, who were in-charge of Chandori, the report said.

Ghat and the temples were submerged after the Nandur Madhyameshwar dam was built in 1907, according to The Nashik Gazetteer.

"Chandori is a Class C pilgrimage destination in Maharashtra as thousands of devotees visit the Khandoba temple. If the government and the ASI collect the idols and help us establish a museum in the village, it will ensure development," said sarpanch Tarle.