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Indo-Pak rapprochement long, difficult process, says US

Ahead of a meeting between the prime ministers of India and Pakistan in New York, the US has said a rapprochement between the two sides, though a "long and difficult process", was good for both of them.



Washington: Ahead of a meeting between the prime ministers of India and Pakistan in New York, the US has said a rapprochement between the two sides, though a "long and difficult process", was good for both of them and the region.
Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and his Pakistani counterpart Nawaz Sharif are scheduled to meet on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly session in New York on Sunday.

The White House welcomed the proposed talks between Singh and Sharif, saying it is a positive development.
"We`re convinced that a rapprochement between Pakistan and India, however long that may take ? and it will undoubtedly be a long and difficult process - will be good for both of those countries, will be good for the international community," Jeffrey Eggers, Director for Afghanistan and Central Region, National Security Staff at the White House told foreign journalists.

"After all, confrontations between two nuclear armed powers have profound implications for the whole world and in particular will be good for Afghanistan," Eggers said.

"The Pakistani-Indian competition is not the only reason that Afghanistan has seen conflict, but it`s one of the reasons that have contributed to tensions. To the extent that that competition is alleviated, it will help significantly stable Afghanistan as well as advance the economies and the safety of the citizens of both Pakistan and India," Eggers said.

PTI

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