8,000-year-old skull found in Norway

Archaeologists have discovered what might be an 8,000-year-old human skull belonging to Stone Age, possibly containing brain matter, in Norway.

London: Archaeologists have discovered what might be an 8,000-year-old human skull belonging to Stone Age, possibly containing brain matter, in Norway.

The finding at a dig site in Stokke, southwest of Oslo could help explain living conditions in the Stone Age, researchers said.

The team has been digging at the site for two months and believe that the site consists of two separate Stone Age settlements.

"It`s seldom enough that we get to dig in a camp from a portion of the Stone Age that we really don`t know much about," excavation leader Gaute Reitan told Norwegian Broadcasting (NRK).
Among many other findings, the latest find is a skull, which still appears to contain brain matter, and researchers hope that the finding will tell them something about how it was to live in the Stone Age.

"Inside it is something rather grey and clay-like. You can just think for yourself what that may be," Reitan said.

Analysis will determine whether other bone fragments found are from people or animals.
One was "quite large, maybe a shoulder - or hip bone," Reitan said.
He said the archaeologists "now need help from the experts" who will analyse and date the material, but he said they`re "quite sure" already that it dates from the Stone Age.

If confirmed, "it can help us learn more about what it was like to live in the Stone Age in Norway," Reitan said.

Some of the bones already found were sent for analysis and dated to around 5,900 BC.

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