close
This ad will auto close in 10 seconds

Nigeria election delay raises red flags at home, abroad

The six-week delay in Nigeria's presidential election has raised red flags both in the international community and among local political and civil rights groups, with many concerned about the independence of the country's electoral commission and whether the military hierarchy had too much say in the matter.



Dakar: The six-week delay in Nigeria's presidential election has raised red flags both in the international community and among local political and civil rights groups, with many concerned about the independence of the country's electoral commission and whether the military hierarchy had too much say in the matter.

President Goodluck Jonathan and his chief rival, former military dictator Muhammadu Buhari, are facing off in what is probably the tightest presidential contest in the history of Nigeria, Africa's most populous nation and its economic powerhouse, so any change like moving back election day is seen as suspicious and a possible game-changer.

Many international observers had already arrived in the country and foreign journalists were struggling to obtain visas when Nigeria's electoral commission announced Saturday it was postponing the Feb 14 presidential and legislative elections until March 28.

"Political interference with the Independent National Electoral Commission is unacceptable," US Secretary of State John Kerry said. "It is critical that the government not use security concerns as a pretext for impeding the democratic process."

Nigerian elections were blatantly rigged until 2011, which was the fairest election ever seen in the country.

But political shenanigans and charges by civil rights groups that the police and military favor Jonathan's party have raised skepticism that the next election will be proper.

A recently released Gallup poll indicates the confidence level declined from 51 percent in 2011 to 13 percent last year.

For weeks, electoral commission chairman Attahiru Jega had resisted pressure to delay the vote, insisting as late as Feb 5, 48 hours before his postponement announcement, that the commission was ready to hold the elections as scheduled.

Jega had already acknowledged that some 30 million of the 68.8 million voters' cards had not been delivered to voters. By Feb 6, the number had risen to 48.2 million delivered.

On Feb 2, the chief of defense staff and chief of army staff had assured a meeting in Abuja, the capital, that they were ready to help secure the elections.

On Feb 6, they wrote to the electoral commission that that would not be possible.

The next day, Jega said it would be "highly irresponsible" to ignore warnings from national security advisers and intelligence officers that the military was overstretched, planning a "major operation" against Islamic extremists in the northeast that would make it unable to perform its traditional role of supporting the police in securing elections.

From Zee News

0 Comment - Join the Discussions

trending

photo gallery

video


WION FEATURES

K8 Plus: Lenovo's new phone available @ Rs 10,999

Heavy security outside Dera Sacha Sauda headquarters in Sirsa as search operation begins

WATCH Exclusive: After Doklam standoff, India begins road construction near LAC

Hurricane Irma, rampaging through Caribbean, is most enduring super-storm on record

Three train derailments in 1 day, fourth accident narrowly-averted

China says Indian Army chief's views contrary to those expressed by Modi, Xi