Climate body says Australia emissions target `not credible`
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Last Updated: Thursday, February 27, 2014, 20:45
  
Sydney: The Australian government's climate change agency warned today that Canberra's five per cent emissions reduction target was "not credible" compared with other countries and called for it to be tripled.

The Climate Change Authority (CCA) said Australia risked losing its competitive edge if it did not accelerate emissions reduction strategies.

Instead of the current commitment to lower greenhouse gas emissions by five percent of 2000 levels by 2020, it said Australia ought to target a minimum reduction of 15 percent.

Doing so would only slow annual growth in average per person income by 0.02 per cent, the authority said in a new report.

"The five percent minimum (at) present isn't credible in terms of the task that has to be done and the time frame," said CCA chairman Bernie Fraser, a former Reserve Bank of Australia governor.

CCA is an independent body set up by the previous Labor government and which the new conservative administration is trying to abolish. The report said Australia's five percent target -- due to be reviewed by the government by April 30 -- was weaker than that of "many other comparable countries".

In the United States the target was a 17 percent reduction on 2005 levels by 2020, Britain was aiming for a 34 percent off 1990 levels and Norway was targeting a 30-40 percent decrease from the same period.

The world's heaviest emitters, China and the US, were both "stepping up their efforts on climate change", the report added, with initiatives including investment in renewable energy, tightening of vehicle emissions standards and local emissions trading pilot schemes.

"A target of 15 percent for Australia would be more in line with the targets being pursued by such countries," the report said.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott once described the science behind man-made climate change as "absolute crap" and dismisses any link between global warming and increasing frequency of events such as drought and wildfires.

AFP

First Published: Thursday, February 27, 2014, 20:45


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