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How Twitter, TV, newspapers reported IPCC's climate evidence

A new study has provided a deeper insight into how Twitter, TV and newspapers reported the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) climate evidence.



Washington: A new study has provided a deeper insight into how Twitter, TV and newspapers reported the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) climate evidence.

IPCC periodically releases Assessment Reports in order to inform policymakers and the public about the latest scientific evidence on climate change. The publication of each report is a key event in the debate about climate change, but their reception and coverage in the media has varied widely.'

Understanding how media coverage varies was important because people's knowledge and opinions on climate change are influenced by how the media reports on the issue.

The study found that there were markedly different ways in which the media portrayed the IPCC's latest findings. The researchers investigated this through studying the frames (ways of depicting an issue) the different media sources used to emphasise some aspects of climate change, whilst downplaying others.

They also found large differences in how much coverage each Working Group received (the IPCC has three, which focus on the physical science, impacts and adaptation, and mitigation respectively).

The researchers found ten different frames used to communicate climate change: Settled Science, Political or Ideological Struggle, Role of Science, Uncertain Science, Disaster, Security, Morality and Ethics, Opportunity, Economics and Health. The first five frames were used to communicate the IPCC reports much more frequently, whereas the latter frames were not used much at all.

The study suggested that the availability of visual content and accessible storylines played a big part in how IPCC science was reported by the media. The authors argue that these findings need to inform how future IPCC Assessment Reports are communicated, in order that policymakers and the public are better informed.

The study is published in the journal Nature Climate Change.  

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