UK remembers 7/7 bombings as threat stays `severe`

Britain`s current threat level continues to be `severe` as a series of events across the country on Wednesday mark the fifth anniversary of the July 7 London bombings, which had claimed 52 lives.

Updated: Jul 07, 2010, 16:06 PM IST

London: Britain`s current threat level
continues to be `severe` as a series of events across the
country on Wednesday mark the fifth anniversary of the July 7 London
bombings, which had claimed 52 lives.

In London, a ceremony will be held in Hyde Park to
mark the tragedy where a wreath would be laid down on behalf
of Prime Minister David Cameron.

Survivors and families of those who lost their lives
in the terror attacks will lay flowers by 52 steel pillars
which represent those killed.

The Home Office said: "The current terrorism threat
level is `Severe`. This means that a terrorist attack is
highly likely".

Security Minister Dame Pauline Neville-Jones will
speak at a conference in London-based think-tank Chatham
House, which aims to reflect on the response that followed the
attacks and assess what threats remain.

The conference organisers said: "Five years on is a
good moment to reflect on the current range of British and
western counter terrorism activity. Counter-terrorism now
operates in many fields, not only in intelligence and
policing, but also in the development of community relations;
in understanding the impact of media reporting; and in
strengthening international collaboration."

In Leeds, an event will be held at the Makkah mosque
in Hyde Park to remember the victims but also highlight the
positive contribution Muslims have made to the UK.

A spokeswoman for the Department for Culture, Media
and Sport said there would be no official ceremony for the
day.

"Many of the families have told us that after five
years, they no longer look to government to lead the
commemorations. They prefer to remember their loved ones in
their own way. Many are planning to visit the memorial
throughout the day. Some will again visit the plaques at the
stations and others prefer not to come to London at all."

PTI